Suboxone Specialist

Mullica Hill Advanced Therapies

Integrative Wellness Specialists & Interventional Pain Management Specialists located in Mullica Hill, NJ

Approved for clinical use in October 2002 by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), buprenorphine represents the latest advance in medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder. Medications such as buprenorphine, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, provide a whole-patient approach to the treatment of opioid use disorder. When taken as prescribed, buprenorphine is safe and effective. Learn more by scheduling a visit online or by phone today.

Suboxone Q & A

What is Buprenorphine (Suboxone)?

Unlike methadone treatment, which must be performed in a highly structured clinic, buprenorphine is the first medication to treat opioid use disorder that is permitted to be prescribed or dispensed in physician offices, significantly increasing treatment access. '

As with all medications used in MAT , buprenorphine is prescribed as part of a comprehensive treatment plan that includes counseling and participation in social support programs.

Buprenorphine offers several benefits to those with opioid use disorder and to others for whom treatment in a methadone clinic is not preferred or is less convenient.

How does buprenorphine (Suboxone) work?

Buprenorphine has unique pharmacological properties that help:

  • Limit the potential for misuse of the drug.
  • Reduce the effects of physical dependence to opioids, such as withdrawal symptoms and cravings
  • Increase safety in cases of overdose

Buprenorphine is an opioid partial agonist. This means that, like opioids, it produces effects such as euphoria or respiratory depression. With buprenorphine, however, these effects are weaker than those of full drugs such as heroin and methadone.

Buprenorphine’s opioid effects increase with each dose until at moderate doses they level off, even with further dose increases. This “ceiling effect” lowers the risk of misuse, dependency, and side effects. Also, because of buprenorphine’s long-acting agent, many patients may not have to take it every day.

Who are candidates for buprenorphine (Suboxone)?

The ideal candidates for opioid dependency treatment with buprenorphine:

  • Have been objectively diagnosed with opioid use disorder
  • Are willing to follow safety precautions for the treatment
  • Have been cleared of any health conflicts with using buprenorphine
  • Have reviewed other treatment options before agreeing tobuprenorphine treatment

How are patients treated with buprenorphine (Suboxone)?

Buprenorphine treatment happens in three phases:

  1. The Induction Phase is the medically monitored startup of buprenorphine treatment performed in a qualified physician’s office or certified OTP using approved buprenorphine products. The medication is administered when a person with an opioid dependency has abstained from using opioids for 12 to 24 hours and is in the early stages of opioid withdrawal. It is important to note that buprenorphine can bring on acute withdrawal for patients who are not in the early stages of withdrawal and who have other opioids in their bloodstream.
  2. The Stabilization Phase begins after a patient has discontinued or greatly reduced their misuse of the problem drug, no longer has cravings, and experiences few, if any, side effects. The buprenorphine dose may need to be adjusted during this phase. Because of the long-acting agent of buprenorphine, once patients have been stabilized, they can sometimes switch to alternate-day dosing instead of dosing every day.
  3. The Maintenance Phase occurs when a patient is doing well on a steady dose of buprenorphine. The length of time of the maintenance phase is tailored to each patient and could be indefinite. Once an individual is stabilized, an alternative approach would be to go into a medically supervised withdrawal, which makes the transition from a physically dependent state smoother. People then can engage in further rehabilitation—with or without MAT—to prevent a possible relapse.


Treatment of opioid use disorder with buprenorphine is most effective in combination with counseling services, which can include different forms of behavioral therapy and self-help programs.

To determine if this treatment is right for you, schedule a consultation today by calling or using the online scheduling tool.